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The 11 Best Wet Dog Food For Huskies

Every Siberian Husky owner understands how energetic these dogs are. Huskies require a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet to replenish and reload, so deciding what to feed is critical.

Huskies are very active and require a lot of calories to keep their energy levels up. Huskies were bred to be working or sledding dogs, and diet is critical whether your husky pulls a sled or lives in a tropical environment like Florida. Canned food might make meals more appealing and give you more protein and water.

BestForPets (bestforpets.org) will look at reviews of the best wet dog food for Huskies in this article to help you choose the best option for you and your Husky companion.

To be safe, we recommend consulting with your veterinarian before changing your husky's food. Also, your Husky might not do well on canned food alone. For the best nutrition, mix canned food with dry kibble. 

How to Choose the Best Wet Dog Food for Huskies

To dig even further, let’s look at some frequently asked questions about wet dog food to verify it’s appropriate for your Husky.

What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Wet Dog Food?

Wet canned food has more moisture than dry kibble, but it must be refrigerated and moved to an airtight container once opened to maintain freshness. Some dogs prefer wet food to dry food, and adding a bit of canned food to dry kibble typically helps a fussy eater who won’t eat their kibble.

Wet food also does not give the necessary quantity of protein for a Husky on a regular basis, therefore combining it with dry kibble is a better alternative.

There is some disagreement over whether moist canned food promotes periodontitis. Some experts feel that the crunch of dry kibble aids in the removal of tartar and plaque development, while others disagree. Brushing their teeth as often as possible is your best chance for canine dental help.

When Is It Best to Feed My Husky?

Siberian Huskies, as you may know, are incredibly energetic dogs that belong to the working group. To avoid bloat, feed your Husky at least 30 minutes after activity and anywhere from 2-4 hours before exercise.

Do I Need to Change My Food Intake at Different Times of the Year?

Ideally, the protein and calorie intake should be tailored to the active Husky, particularly if you have Huskies for sled pulling or other jobs. Huskies require around 30% protein (ideally from dry kibble) and 18%-20% fat on a daily basis.

You can reduce your protein intake somewhat during the warmer months (if your Husky is not as active). As a general guideline, supply the appropriate quantity of protein while your Husky is most active and reduce during months when your Husky is not as active.

Consult your veterinarian to establish the appropriate quantity of protein for your specific Husky based on activity levels.

What Qualities Should I Look for in Canned Food?

When shopping for canned foods, make sure to read the back labels and look through the ingredient list. Because Huskies require a sufficient quantity of protein, the first item should be a high-quality protein, such as fish, meat, chicken, or bison.

Check for any artificial flavors or preservatives, as well as any components that your Husky may be sensitive to.

How Frequently Should I Feed My Husky?

Huskies perform best when fed twice a day, once in the morning and once in the afternoon. As long as it’s dry kibble, you can leave food out for your Husky. If there is any left over wet canned food, it should be stored and refrigerated. Huskies will not eat if they are full, and it is normal for them to leave food in the dish.

Conclusion

Blue Buffalo Homestyle Recipe is the finest overall canned dog food because it has good protein that is complete and balanced. Purina ONE SmartBlend True Instinct is nutrient-dense and high in protein for the greatest value. Merrick Grain-Free Wet Dog Food The Cowboy Cookout is a premium option that has high protein and is grain free.

AFFCO’s Chicken Soup for the Soul meets AFFCO’s dietary guidelines for developing pups. Finally, Royal Canin Adult Canned Dog Food is a tasty alternative to our Vet’s Choice. It contains antioxidants and amino acids.

BestForPets (bestforpets.org) hopes these evaluations assist you in making the best wet dog food for Huskies . Remember, if in doubt, seek advice from your veterinarian.

Reviews

Best Overall: Chicken Dinner Blue Buffalo Homestyle Recipe

  • Chicken, chicken broth, and chicken liver are the main components.
  • 8.50% protein content
  • 5.50% fat content
  • 451 kilocalories per can

Recipe for Blue Buffalo Homestyle With actual chicken as the first component, Chicken Dinner is a fantastic protein source. It’s a comprehensive and balanced meal that may be fed with dry kibble.

It offers a lovely, balanced combination of carrots, sweet potatoes, and peas, all of which are good protein sources for your Husky. It is corn, soy, and wheat-free for people with food allergies.

This food has no artificial flavors, preservatives, or byproducts. It contains oats, brown rice, and barley, as well as blueberries and cranberries for nutritious fruits. This dish has a pâté consistency and is popular with most dogs.

The cans occasionally come broken, and some may be overly watered down. A case of 12, 12.5-ounce cans or a bundle of two cases can be purchased at a reasonable price.

This food is our pick for the best overall wet dog food for Huskies, with healthy ingredients, zero by-products, and serving as a complete and balanced meal.

Pros

  • The first component is real chicken.
  • Full and balanced
  • Excellent protein source
  • Free of corn, soy, and wheat

Cons

  • Cans might come damaged.
  • Food may be too diluted.

 

Best Value: True Instinct Purina ONE SmartBlend

  • Beef broth, beef, and chicken are the main components.
  • 11% protein content
  • 3.50% fat content
  • 374 calories per can

Purina ONE SmartBlend True Instinct is made with genuine beef, chicken, and wild-caught salmon, all of which are high in protein. This nutrient-dense meal has gravy, which adds taste and appeals to Huskies.

It has no artificial flavors or preservatives, and the high protein content keeps muscles strong. It is full and balanced in vitamins and minerals, and the antioxidants help to maintain a healthy immune system and coat.

This food contains wheat, gluten, and soy, so avoid it if your Husky is allergic to these ingredients. This recipe is also available in kibble form, which you can use as a topper for an extra treat and protein boost.

Cans may come dented or damaged, but the total pricing for a case of 12 13-ounce cans is a fair bargain, making it our selection for the finest wet dog food for Huskies.

Pros

  • Real meat, poultry, and wild-caught fish are included.
  • Excellent value
  • Nutrient-dense
  • Antioxidants are present.
  • Full and balanced

Cons

  • Wheat gluten and soy are present.
  • Cans are frequently dented or damaged when they arrive.

 

Premium Choice: Cowboy Cookout Merrick Grain-Free Wet Dog Food

  • Deboned meat, beef broth, and chicken broth are the main components.
  • 8% protein content
  • 3% fat content
  • 397 calories per can

Grain-Free Merrick Wet Dog Food Cowboy Cookout is a grain-free choice for Huskies with grain allergies. The first component is USDA-inspected deboned beef, followed by beef broth, chicken broth, and beef liver.

It contains carrots, green beans, and granny smith apples and has no artificial flavors, preservatives, or by-products.

The beef gravy gives a great taste as well as moisture to the can for hydration. The pull tab on the cans makes opening them simple, and you can use this food as a topping or a whole meal.

This meal comes in 12.7-ounce cans and is a touch costly, but the healthy contents make up for it. The most common complaint is that there is more gravy than meat.

Unless your dog has a grain allergy, grains are generally beneficial to most dogs. Check with your veterinarian to see if moving to a grain-free diet is essential.

Pros

  • The first ingredient is USDA-inspected deboned beef.
  • Grain-free for individuals who are allergic to grains
  • There are no artificial flavors or preservatives.
  • Pull-tabs for simple opening

Cons

  • There might be more gravy than meat.
  • Expensive

 

Best for Puppies: Chicken Noodle Soup for the Soul

  • Chicken, chicken liver, and turkey are the main components.
  • 9% protein content
  • 6% fat content
  • 474 calories per can

Chicken Soup for the Soul has actual chicken as the main component, making it ideal for the Husky dog in your life. Other protein options to get your puppy started are turkey, duck, and salmon.

This dish also includes nutritious grains, vegetables, and fruits including apples, cranberries, carrots, whole grain brown rice, peas, and potatoes, as well as vitamins and minerals, making it a complete and balanced supper for your developing puppy.

It satisfies AAFCO nutritional guidelines to promote your puppy’s full growth, and it contains DHA for brain and eye development.

Some customers claim the meal makes their pups ill with upset stomachs, while others claim the pâté-style consistency is excessively dry.

Pros

  • The first component is real chicken.
  • Contains nutritious grains, fruits, and vegetables
  • Puppy food that is complete and balanced
  • AAFCO nutritional criteria are met.
  • DHA is present for brain and ocular development.

Cons

  • The consistency might be too dry.
  • May induce stomach discomfort

 

Vet’s Choice: Adult Canned Dog Food by Royal Canin

  • Water (for processing), chicken, and hog liver are the main components.
  • 6.50% protein content
  • 3% fat content
  • 386 calories per can

Royal Canin Adult Canned Dog Food is designed for large breed dogs at least 15 months old, although it can also be fed to small breed dogs 10 months and older. It is high in B vitamins and minerals like zinc, which are essential for good health.

It contains amino acids and antioxidants that promote healthy skin and coat, as well as substances that promote healthy nervous system activity.

This recipe makes a delicious loaf-style supper, and it’s available in 13.5-ounce cans in a case of 12 or a two-case bundle.

This recipe contains chicken by-products and beef by-products, both of which are contentious dog food components. By-products can increase protein intake, however they are made up of “leftover” animal components from the slaughtering process, such as the stomach, brain, spleen, kidneys, bone, and fatty tissue.

If you are unsure whether or not to feed by-products to your Husky, you can always speak with your veterinarian.

Pros

  • really tasty
  • Real chicken and pork are used.
  • It is high in vitamins and minerals.
  • Antioxidants and amino acids are present.

Cons

  • It contains chicken and pig byproducts.

 

Adult 7+ Hill’s Science Diet Savory Stew with Chicken & Vegetables

  • Water, chicken, and pork liver are the main components.
  • 4% protein content
  • 2.80% fat content
  • 305 kilocalories per can

Although Hill’s Science Diet Adult 7+ Savory Stew with Chicken & Vegetables is exclusively for dogs 7 years and older, we thought it was worth including on our list.

For many years, veterinarians have suggested Hill’s Science Diet, and the healthful components in this meal will supply your Husky with all the nutrition he requires.

It’s prepared with genuine chicken, brown rice, and nutritious vegetables to keep your Husky energetic. The diet is easy to digest and contains nutrients that are balanced for kidney and heart health.

It doesn’t have as much protein as other recipes on our list (4%), but bear in mind that it’s designed for dogs aged 7 and over, who may not be as active.

The consistency of the meat may be difficult for certain dogs to chew, especially if teeth have fallen out due to aging. Another disadvantage is that the food may have a watery quality, and cans may come damaged. This food is available in 12.8-ounce cans in cases of 12 or in a bundle.

Pros

  • The first component is real chicken.
  • Veterinarian advised
  • Suitable for seniors aged 7 and up.

Cons

  • the consistency of water
  • Meat may be difficult for elderly dogs to chew.
  • Dented cans may come.

 

Beef Dinner with Garden Vegetables and Sweet Potatoes, Blue Buffalo Homestyle Recipe

  • Beef, beef broth, and beef liver are the main components.
  • 8.50% protein content
  • 6% fat content
  • 398 kilocalories per cup

Blue Buffalo has reached our list again again, this time with their Blue Buffalo Homestyle Recipe Beef Dinner with Garden Vegetables and Sweet Potatoes. Blue Buffalo makes the best dog chow possible by using natural ingredients.

The first component in this nutrient-dense cuisine is real beef, and it comes in a case of 12 12.5-ounce cans. This formula contains no by-products, wheat, corn, or soy, only healthy and natural ingredients to guarantee your Husky receives adequate nourishment.

This cuisine is nutritious since it contains carrots, sweet potatoes, brown rice, peas, oats, blueberries, and cranberries.

Some customers have claimed that the food is mushy and difficult to get out of the can.

Pros

  • The first component is real meat.
  • Nutrient-dense
  • There will be no wheat, corn, or soy.

Cons

  • The consistency is mushy.

 

Natural Balance Diet with Few Ingredients Brown Rice with Lamb

  • Lamb, lamb broth, and lamb liver are the main components.
  • 8% protein content
  • 6.50% fat content
  • 500 calories per can

Natural Balance Limited Ingredient Diet Lamb & Brown Rice is ideal for Huskies that enjoy lamb.

This might be the answer. The primary component in this meal is actual lamb, followed by lamb broth and lamb liver. Lamb is a fantastic source of protein for your Husky, and it is gluten-free, as well as high in vitamins and minerals.

Brown rice is high in fiber, and the additional canola oil promotes healthy skin and coat. This limited ingredient dog food has all of the vitamins and minerals your Husky requires on a regular basis and is devoid of extraneous additives like corn, wheat, soy, or artificial flavors.

The cans may come broken and dented, like with any canned food, and it does contain a trace of carrageenan. This possibly dangerous and contentious substance has been linked to inflammation and various malignancies.

Pros

  • The first component is real lamb.
  • Ingredients are few.
  • Full and balanced
  • Gluten-free

Cons

  • Cans come dented and damaged.
  • Carrageenan is present.

 

ProActive Health Classic Ground with Chicken and Whole Grain Rice by Iams

  • Chicken, water, and meat byproducts are the main components.
  • 8% protein content
  • 6% fat content
  • 425 calories per can

ProActive Health Classic Ground Chicken & Whole Grain The first ingredient in rice is genuine chicken. Brown rice and oatmeal are added for grains and an energy boost, and it’s high in omega-6 fatty acids, which help maintain a healthy coat and skin. This meal is full and balanced, and it comes highly recommended by veterinarians.

Because this recipe contains animal by-products, you should avoid it if you are not comfortable giving these components to your dog.

This food is suitable for Huskies aged one year and up, and it comes in a case of 12 13-ounce cans for a decent price. It’s also available as a six-pack or a 24-can bundle. The cans have a 24-month shelf life. The recipe may be inconsistent, as some are more pâté-like and others are chunkier.

Pros

  • The first component is real chicken.
  • Omega-6 fatty acids promote skin and coat health.
  • Affordable
  • Vet-recommended

Cons

  • Contains by-products of meat
  • Food consistency varies.

Author Image

Dr. Deborah Fletcher

Deborah R. Fletcher, DVM, is a skilled veterinarian with more than 15 years of experience dealing with companion and exotic animals. She has experience caring for a variety of animals, including household cats and dogs, reptiles, birds of prey, and even primates. Dr. Fletcher is a valuable part of the BestForPets team, where she contributes to their aim of providing pets and their owners with the finest possible treatment and services.

Veterinarian (DVM) Dr. Deborah Fletcher

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